Quick work nets two arrests

Published 9:41am Tuesday, February 25, 2014

MENOLA – Quick work by the Hertford County Sheriff’s Office led to the arrest of two local men here Friday, one who frightened a young teen during a break-in of her home in this small community.

Jarvis Alvin Holley, 24, of 130 Pinetops Road, Murfreesboro, is being held under a $102,000 secured bond in connection with two breaking-and-entering cases on Friday. Holley, who admitted guilt in both cases, stands charged with two felony counts each of breaking and entering, larceny, and possession of stolen goods. He was also charged with two misdemeanor counts of injury to property.

Jarvis Holley
Jarvis Holley

Holley is scheduled to make his first appearance today (Tuesday) in Hertford County District Court.

Also arrested in the case was Scotty Tyrone Tann, 28, of 132 Lincoln Park, Rich Square. He was charged with possession of stolen goods and jailed under a $1,000 secured bond. His court date is also set for Tuesday.

According to Hertford County Sheriff Juan Vaughan, his office received a call at 12:15 p.m. on Friday in reference to a break-in in progress at a residence on the St. John-Menola Road. HCSO Captain Will Liverman, Investigator Dexter Hayes and Deputy Chase Oliver responded to that call.

“The call came in that a 14-year-old female was alone at her home and someone was kicking in the back door of the residence,” Vaughan said. “The young girl hid in a closet and called a family member, and that person called us.”

Upon the arrival of the deputies, the suspect had left the scene, but the teen had given the lawmen a description of the suspect.

Scotty Tann
Scotty Tann

“I know she was scared out of her wits, but she had the presence of mind to hide from view and was able to discretely get in contact with a family member who, in turn, got in touch with us and relayed some very good information about who we needed to look for,” Vaughan stated.

Taking a proactive approach, Liverman, Hayes and Oliver began stopping vehicles in that area in an effort to learn if those individuals may have seen something suspicious.

On Benthall Bridge Road (which links the Menola community with Murfreesboro), Oliver stopped a vehicle to question the driver.

“As Deputy Oliver was speaking with the driver, he noticed a flat screen TV, partially covered by a coat, in the back seat of that vehicle,” Vaughan said. “By that time, Captain Liverman arrived at the scene and the driver was further questioned about the TV. He told my Captain that he had just purchased it from a young man named Jarvis, who was driving a white Nissan Maxima, for $40 on the side of the road not too far from the Murfreesboro Bypass.”

Tann was the driver of that vehicle.

Meanwhile, a search was underway for Holley, who was known to the officers.

“My officers went to his residence, where they found both Mr. Holley and a white Nissan Maxima,” Vaughan reported. “We were able to recover a second TV stolen from the Menola residence, plus the one in Mr. Tann’s possession, as well as a Wii set, a Playstation 3 and a computer tablet, all taken from that same residence.”

Vaughan added that Holley also admitted to a break-in the same day at a residence in the Vaughantown community, located off Benthall Bridge Road, where a 32-inch TV was stolen. HCSO Investigator Greg Harrison, Sgt. Allen Archer and Deputy Brian Pearce worked that case.

“We haven’t recovered the TV stolen from the Vaughantown break-in, but we’re still working that case,” said the Sheriff.

What pleased the Sheriff, and the victims, was that the arrests were made within two hours.

“I commend my guys for some great investigative work,” Vaughan said. “The groundwork they did by stopping those vehicles and asking questions really paid off. I also need to praise the young lady for remaining calm in a sticky situation and helping us with the information she was able to share.”

Vaughan added that he also appreciated the assistance of Murfreesboro Police Chief Darrell Rowe and his officers.

He closed by offering advice to local residents.

“If you spot something that looks suspicious, like a strange car in your neighborhood or a person at a place they shouldn’t be, don’t approach them….rather jot down all the information you can about their personal appearance and make, model and license plate of the vehicle, and call us,” the Sheriff suggested. “The more we know about a crime means a better chance of arresting the person or persons responsible.”

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